Homepage 'de Luikerwaal' Filmstrip Lanterns - part 2.
 


Gold coloured projector for showing oblong film strips each holding 13 pictures.
Made by Optimar, Salzburg.

 


This lantern was also sold as a Walt Disney projector; the side of the cardboard box shows an image of Mickey Mouse.


In May 1945 Kodak stopped producing their Camera-X, a photo camera disguised as a matchbox, and one went looking for a replacement factory in Europe. The company OPTIMAR was founded in 1947 in Salzburg, at that time an American occupation zone. That is why it was commissioned to make copies of the Camera-X. For whom the cameras are made is not clear. The camera was never commercially available.


Relatively modern filmstrip projector made by NEAM (Probably: Nederlandse Elektrische Apparaten Maatschappij - Dutch Electrical Apparatus Company), c. 1947.
Exactly the same projector (with the exception of the colour) was released under the Lucky News trademark. See also the Lucky projector below.


 



A wide variety of film strips in cardboard, plastic and metal boxes.

 



Lucky film strip projector from the 1950s with a remarkable User Manual: 'The use of this family projector will be known to everyone'. A manual that is not a manual, because .... it's not necessary after all.




 




The Kinga Baby was a plastic toy projector, working with 35 mm films which were actually a series of slides that were not cut and mounted in frames but kept on the role as a whole. The roll of film was placed in a metal film holder and was shifted into the projector, and then transported by hand, one slide per slide.
Bajka Diaskop filmstrip projector c. 1955. The Diaskop was made in the Polish factory of Wictor Bielecki from 1953. At first sight this lantern is made of metal but it is actually made of bakelite and treated with a special email varnish.  The projector works with 35 mm film strips. Special for this projector was the film holder and transport mechanism that was inside the projector, invisible from the outside.
This projector is produced in a very large variety of metallic colours.
 
German CA - KINDERKINO in original cardboard box, using a film guide and single reel with crank for moving the film strip, and a normal electric bulb in an E 27 socket for illumination.

 


CIFO film strip projector for children made in the Netherlands.

Advertisement De Kampioen, dec. 1956: A beautiful St. Nicholas gift that the whole family gives fun! The Cifo projector is entertaining, educational and ... brings home conviviality.
Sales price, complete in luxury suitcase fl. 25.00.


 
German 'Jugendbildwerfer' model 'Magica'. This special filmstrip projector is almost completely made of bakelite. The manufacturer is VEB Edelstahlwerk Freital.

 


Two filmstrip projectors from the manufacturer Clairo. This manufacturer was also a well-known producer of filmstrips.
 
Ania filmstrip projector made in Poland by Prexer Lodzkie Zaklady Kinotechniczne, Lodz, around 1985. The filmstrip is inserted in a slot at the top of the projector and is wound up automatically in a room at the bottom. There are no reels for the film.

 

Projector or viewer? Anyway too nice not to include here. A special small projector with built-in projection screen for 35 mm filmstrips, The Junior Television Set. Manufacturer: Film-Stips, Nr. Dunstable - Beds, 1955. The film is driven on by a clockwork motor, the lighting works on a battery. Size 18.5 cm x 15.6 cm x 10.6 cm.
 
Okay, one more then. Then we stop all that modern stuff. The design of this SOWA filmstrip projector is so special however that it should not be missing in this collection. This 'Kugelprojector' was made in Germany in 1959 and was also called 'Sputnik projector'.


The projector is tiltable and the power supply of the lamp is provided by a built-in transformer. Dimensions approximately 30 x 20 x 18 cm.
 

 

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